*** Please note that various posts will contain affiliate links for Amazon. Purchases from these links will make me a small percentage in store credit. ***

28 March 2017

You Suck by Christopher Moore (Tuesday Intros & Teaser Tuesday)

If you have any issues with "questionable" language 
and/or vampires and/or absurdity ...
click on out of here now and go on your 
merry little way back to wherever it is you
came from. This is your warning.

Really.

There are "bad words" in Christopher Moore's books.
And vampires (in some of them, anyway).
And absurdity galore.

Therefore, the teasers in this post will also have those things.

I will delete any comment that complains.
(I will then pity the complainers for missing out as
Moore is likely my favorite male author. Ever.)

You've been warned.

*

*

*

*

Being undead sucks. Literally.
Just ask C. Thomas Flood. Waking up after a fantastic night unlike anything he's ever experienced, he discovers that his girlfriend, Jody, is a vampire. And surprise! Now he's one, too. For some couples, the whole biting-and-blood thing would have been a deal breaker. But Tommy and Jody are in love, and they vow to work through their issues.
But word has it that the vampire who initially nibbled on Jody wasn't supposed to be recruiting. Even worse, Tommy's erstwhile turkey-bowling pals are out to get him, at the urging of a blue-dyed Las Vegas call girl named (duh) Blue.
And that really sucks.

*

*

*

*

This is your final warning.

*

*

*

*


"First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros" is from the first paragraph or two of a book being read now (or in the future) and is hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea. "Teaser Tuesday" at The Purple Booker asks for a random line or two from anywhere in the book currently being read.

24 March 2017

The Choir on Hope Street by Annie Lyons (Book Beginnings & Friday 56)

Annie Lyons has been on my "to read" list for a while now so I was thrilled when her upcoming The Choir on Hope Street appeared on NetGalley (and, soon after, my NetGalley shelf!).  It's set to be released on April 6th and if you're a fan of chick lit, romantic comedies (although the romance is light), singing and/or really good stories about community spirit, I highly recommend giving this one a shot.

Natalie and Caroline are the two main characters and, seemingly, all they have in common are their children who are in the same school and the fact that they both live on Hope Street. The chapters alternate between the two of them and their issues. Natalie is having trouble with her husband; Caroline is having trouble with her mother. They're brought together in an effort to help save the local community center (after, that is, one of them kind of hits the other with their car), and a beautifully unexpected friendship forms.

Lyons has created a wonderful community here and I found myself caring about all of the members of the choir. From Jim the mailman (with the surprising musical past), to shy songbird Doly, to Pamela and her amazing cakes -- these are all people I would want to know and have in my corner. I'm hoping that Lyons will decide to revisit them all again!

Friday 56 (today is 56% from the digital ARC) is hosted at Freda's Voice 
& Book Beginnings (share the first few sentences) is at Rose City Reader.

The best things in life happen when you least expect them
Nat’s husband has just said the six words no one wants to hear – ‘I don’t love you any more’.
Caroline’s estranged mother has to move into her house turning her perfectly ordered world upside down.
Living on the same street these two women couldn’t be more different. Until the beloved local community centre is threatened with closure. And when the only way to save it is to form a community choir – none of the Hope Street residents, least of all Nat and Caroline, expect the results…
This spring, hope is coming!

21 March 2017

A June of Ordinary Murders by Conor Brady - #readireland2017 #begorrathon2017 (Tuesday Intros & Teaser Tuesday)

A June of Ordinary Murders is the first book in Conor Brady's series featuring Detective Sergeant Joe Swallow. The story begins 17 June 1887 -- just a few days before Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. (At this point in history Ireland was still under British rule.) Swallow is called in to investigate after a man and child have been found murdered in a park and, while puzzling, he feels it to be just an "ordinary crime." Of course, the further he digs the less ordinary it is.

I started reading this Sunday night at work after accidentally leaving Black Rabbit Hall at home.  Right now I'm about a third of the way through and I'm enjoying it immensely. Brady has a very similar style as Charles Finch (in fact, Finch wrote a blurb for the book which almost never happens), and since I was just thinking to myself last week that I need to dive back into the Charles Lenox series this came as great timing to scratch that itch (which, you probably know, only makes it itch more). I've read and loved quite a lot of books based in and around London during this time period, but I believe this is my first set in Ireland (thanks, Begorrathon!). It definitely won't be my last.

"First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros" is from the first paragraph or two of a book being read now (or in the future) and is hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea. "Teaser Tuesday" at The Purple Booker asks for a random line or two from anywhere in the book currently being read.


**************************************
See more Begorrathon posts HERE.